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Posted 10:36 am
September 1, 2014

Commute to campus comes at a higher cost for students after Muni and parking price increases

The commute to SF State became more expensive today, with the price for a single ride on Muni increasing to $2.25. The surge in cost follows the introduction of a $1 increase on daily parking passes on campus July 1.

“I don’t like it,” said SF State student Coel James, who rides public transportation three times a week. “If I’m paying more, there should be more buses.”

San Francisco Municipal Transit Authority (SFMTA) boosted the price of monthly passes, including the Adult “A” Fast Pass, from $76 to $80, and the “M” Fast Pass, from $66 to $68, to match the single ride increase. The fare for a Lifeline monthly pass, a discounted pass for limited-income residents, rose from $33 to $34 as well.

Monthly passes for seniors, the disabled and youth remained unchanged, but are expected to rise along with the fast passes in 2016.

“If you’re commuting twice a day, it adds up,” said student Bradley Lewis, who rides the 29-Sunset to and from campus. He added that the price bump for adult commuters seemed unwarranted.

SFMTA spokesperson Paul Rose said that the price increments are the result of a formula “that aims to keep pace with inflation.”

“In 2009 our board of directors made the decision to raise fares incrementally, rather than by a large sum all at once, based on this cost of living formula,” Rose said in an email.

Along with the Muni fee hikes came a rise in the SF State daily parking permit fee from $6 to $7, which took effect over summer and was the first increase of its kind in two years.

The raise in parking costs was enacted to pay for a $4.2 million debt accumulated during a seismic retrofit, an earthquake safety precaution for buildings, to the parking garage near Cox Stadium, according to Reggie Parson, deputy chief of the University Police Department.

“Parking is not supported by the State General Fund,” Parson said, adding that a reduced number of vehicles parking in the garage also contributes to a need for increased funds. “Parking fees pay for the maintenance of the parking structure.”

Shaye Morin, 19, said though the rise in parking prices might be problematic at first, the funds are going toward something the school needs.

“In the short term it’s a little annoying like any increase,” Morin said, who does not drive to campus. “But if it’s helping the school be more safe, I’d be more willing to pay it.”